Hamilton Falls
Jamaica, VT

RATING: 4.5/5.0

Hamilton Falls
(click for larger image)

STATE: Vermont
COUNTY: Windham County
TOWN: Jamaica
PARK: Hamilton Falls Natural Area
TYPE: Horsetails and slides
HEIGHT: Approximately 125-foot total drop
WATER SOURCE: Cobb Brook
TRAIL LENGTH: 0.2 mile to base of falls
TRAIL DIFFICULTY: Easy side of moderate
HIKING TIME: 10 minutes
ALTITUDE GAIN: -150 feet to base of falls
WHEN TO VISIT: May to October
SWIMMING: Good
DELORME ATLAS: Page 26, I-3 (marked)
HANDICAP ACCESS: No
INCLUDED IN BOOK: Yes (Included in 2nd Edition of book as a full chapter)
DOGS ALLOWED: Yes
COST TO VISIT: Free
ALTERNATE NAMES: None Noted
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THE FALLS:

A short distance northeast of Jamaica State Park is the final mile of Cobb Brook, a water source renowned for one of Vermont's tallest waterfalls, 125-foot Hamilton Falls. The waters of the brook literally slice their way sideways through deeply cut gorge walls before landing in popular wading pools below the entire formation. At the top of the falls is a deep pool and rock ledges that people often illegally jump off. For your own safety, swimming is prohibited here, and for good reason. A sign at the falls states that ten people have died here. The currents in this pool are deadly and should be avoided.
         Hamilton Falls is an amazing place to bring children and have a picnic. There are sunny areas for tanning, but still enough shade along the side to keep cool. You will find that this waterfall is very popular and there will be other people there relaxing as well. Most of these visitors tend to be from out-of-staters, which is rather surprising, because most refreshing waterfalls in Vermont are only locally known.
         Nearby Jamaica State Park also offers hiking, camping, hunting, fishing, whitewater kayaking (one weekend in spring and fall, the Ball Mountain Dam releases high levels of water and kayakers and canoeists have made events out of these dates). The area inside Jamaica State Park also has some history of particular interest. In 1748, the last year of King George's War, the debate over the borders of ?New France? and the ?British Colonies? was still in full disagreement. On the night of May 31, 1748, two Frenchmen and nine Indians crept up the West River in what is now the town of Londonderry and attacked British Troops, killing five and wounding another. This massacre occurred at Salmon Hole, a popular fishing spot, during that time period on the West River (it is now known more as a popular swimming hole).


TRAIL INFORMATION:

Please see trail information in our published guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades And Waterfalls, or you can email us (gparsons66@hotmail.com) and we will happily provide them to you. When requesting information via email, please remember to specify which particular waterfall(s) you are interested in.


DIRECTIONS:

Please see directions in our published guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades And Waterfalls, or you can email us (gparsons66@hotmail.com) and we will happily provide them to you. When requesting directions via email, please remember to specify which particular waterfall(s) you are looking for directions to.


SPECIAL NOTES / UPDATES SINCE THE 2ND EDITION:

None.




INTERESTED IN VISITING MORE NEW ENGLAND WATERFALLS?

Take a peek at our published 376-page guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades and Waterfalls! Click on either of the cover photos below to read reviews and/or to purchase the guidebook directly on amazon.com.


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Waterfalls, swimming holes, and hiking can be extremely dangerous. Hundreds of people have been injured or killed in the waterfalls and swimming holes of New England over the last 50 years. Never swim when the water currents seem like they are too high or strong. Use of this website and all of its information is at your own risk! Be safe out there - and always use common sense!