Huntington Gorge
Richmond, VT

RATING: 4.0/5.0

Huntington Gorge
(click for larger image)

STATE: Vermont
COUNTY: Chittenden County
TOWN: Richmond
PARK: N/A
TYPE: Horsetails and cascades
HEIGHT: Main horsetail is 15 feet; 30-foot total drop
WATER SOURCE: Huntington River
TRAIL LENGTH: Less than 0.1 mile
TRAIL DIFFICULTY: Easy
HIKING TIME: Negligible
ALTITUDE GAIN: None
WHEN TO VISIT: Year Round
SWIMMING: Good
DELORME ATLAS: Page 45, K-12 (unmarked)
HANDICAP ACCESS: No
INCLUDED IN BOOK: Yes (Included in 2nd Edition of book as a full chapter)
DOGS ALLOWED: Yes
COST TO VISIT: Free
ALTERNATE NAMES: None Noted



THE FALLS:

Huntington Gorge is as famous for its swimming holes as it is for its frightening death toll racked up in the last half-century. A sign at the falls indicates the tragic fates of almost two dozen visitors over the last sixty years. With some common sense, and some careful scouting, visitors can bypass the obvious dangers here, and enjoy the popular swimming holes and marvel at the gorge and falls.
         The gorge attracts some of the craziest personalities. We have seen many young adults leaping off sloping gorge walls, and others diving into swimming pools not nearly deep enough to warrant safe diving practices.
         For falls, the gorge has many small treasures, approximately half of which can be seen at each vantage point. There is also one main horsetail falling into the pool at the end of the gorge. The currents between the falls continue through the popular swimming pools within the gorge. We urge you to bypass these dangerous spots and restrict swimming to the large channel below the bottom falls.
         The area also happens to be a little history regarding this waterfall. By 1802, a grist mill opened at the site, and operated continuously for over a century. The Richmond Light and Power Company converted the mill in 1903 to generate electricity for the nearby villages. Nowadays, the gorge lies in its natural state, with evidence of past use nearly non-existent. Make sure to plan on spending hours at Huntington Gorge, and many more if you visit the other must see waterfall of the area, The Potholes and Honey Hollow Falls.


TRAIL INFORMATION:

Please see trail information in our published guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades And Waterfalls, or you can email us (gparsons66@hotmail.com) and we will happily provide them to you. When requesting information via email, please remember to specify which particular waterfall(s) you are interested in.


DIRECTIONS:

Please see directions in our published guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades And Waterfalls, or you can email us (gparsons66@hotmail.com) and we will happily provide them to you. When requesting directions via email, please remember to specify which particular waterfall(s) you are looking for directions to.


SPECIAL NOTES / UPDATES SINCE THE 2ND EDITION:

None.




INTERESTED IN VISITING MORE NEW ENGLAND WATERFALLS?

Take a peek at our published 376-page guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades and Waterfalls! Click on either of the cover photos below to read reviews and/or purchase the guidebook directly on amazon.com.


Over 15,000 Copies Sold!

also available on...


EXPLORE MORE WATERFALLS!
Connecticut /  Maine /  Massachusetts /  New Hampshire  /  Vermont
Home Page /  About the Book /  Book Updates /  Top 40 Waterfalls /  Photo Gallery /  Contact Us

© newenglandwaterfalls.com
Waterfalls, swimming holes, and hiking can be extremely dangerous. Hundreds of people have been injured or killed in the waterfalls and swimming holes of New England over the last 50 years. Never swim when the water currents seem like they are too high or strong. Use of this website and all of its information is at your own risk! Be safe out there - and always use common sense!