Nancy Cascades
Livermore, NH

RATING: 5.0/5.0

Nancy Cascades
(click for larger image)

STATE: New Hampshire
COUNTY: Grafton County
TOWN: Livermore
PARK: White Mountain National Forest
TYPE: Horsetails and cascades
HEIGHT: Approximately 300-foot total drop
WATER SOURCE: Nancy Brook
TRAIL LENGTH: To lower falls, 2.4 miles; to upper falls, 2.8 miles
TRAIL DIFFICULTY: Moderate side of difficult
HIKING TIME: 2 hours
ALTITUDE GAIN: +1700 feet to upper falls
WHEN TO VISIT: May to October
SWIMMING: Not Possible and/or Prohibited
DELORME ATLAS: Page 44, G-4 (marked as ?Nancy Brook?)
HANDICAP ACCESS: No
INCLUDED IN BOOK: Yes (Included in 2nd Edition of book as a full chapter)
DOGS ALLOWED: Yes
COST TO VISIT: Free
ALTERNATE NAMES: None Noted



THE FALLS:

The sum of the height of the cascades that adorn Nancy Brook is estimated at 300 feet, making Nancy Cascades undeniably one of the tallest in New England. Nancy Brook is fed by the waters of Nancy Pond. Both the cascades and the pond have been held in high regard for over a century, and rightfully so.
         A rust colored pool below the 45-foot fanning horsetail marks the lowest segment of the cascades. The waters of Nancy Brook cascade down gray gneiss bedrock before hopping over a ledge, causing the water to plunge the remaining distance into the pool below. By the time you reach the lower falls, at mile 2.4 on the trail, you may be tired of the continuous climbing effort already demanded of you. For that reason, the spectacular lower falls are a rewarding relief.
         Above the main falls are hundreds of feet of chutes, slides, horsetails and small plunges equally as stunning and charming as the bottom falls. About 0.7 mile above the uppermost falls, Nancy Pond, also accessed by same trail, is a remote, peaceful body of water just southeast of Mt. Nancy.
         The brook, pond, falls, and a nearby mountain are named after a passionate servant woman, known only as ?Nancy?, who entered Crawford Notch during a White Mountain winter, trying to reach the camp where her lost fianc?e was. Failing to catch up with her lover, who left Nancy without saying goodbye to go on a trip (why he left is not known), Nancy crossed the Saco River and quickly become exhausted by the chilly waters, and was found dead from hypothermia the next day.


TRAIL INFORMATION:

Please see trail information in our published guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades And Waterfalls, or you can email us (gparsons66@hotmail.com) and we will happily provide them to you. When requesting information via email, please remember to specify which particular waterfall(s) you are interested in.


DIRECTIONS:

Please see directions in our published guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades And Waterfalls, or you can email us (gparsons66@hotmail.com) and we will happily provide them to you. When requesting directions via email, please remember to specify which particular waterfall(s) you are looking for directions to.


SPECIAL NOTES / UPDATES SINCE THE 2ND EDITION:

None.




INTERESTED IN VISITING MORE NEW ENGLAND WATERFALLS?

Take a peek at our published 376-page guidebook, New England Waterfalls: A Guide to More Than 400 Cascades and Waterfalls! Click on either of the cover photos below to read reviews and/or purchase the guidebook directly on amazon.com.


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