BACKPACKING IN VERMONT


Camel's Hump Montclair Glen Lodge, Camel's Hump Mount Mansfield, Vermont

Welcome to the Newenglandwaterfalls.com guide to backpacking in Vermont!

Vermont offers some of the finest backpacking terrain in the United States. The state features more lean-tos/shelters than any other state in New England. Crowds are far less dense than in neighboring New Hampshire, but the scenery is nearly as impressive. Vermont has the 270+ mile Long Trail, which is undeniably one of the finest month-long backpacking trips in the country (perhaps 2nd best in the U.S.A. after California's permit-based John Muir Trail).

The premier backpacking destinations of Vermont are:
  • The Appalachian Trail
  • Camel's Hump
  • The Long Trail
  • Lye Brook Wilderness / Stratton Pond
  • Mount Mansfield
If you are going to go backpacking in Vermont, pick up a copy of the latest edition of these thorough and extremely accurate guidebooks: AMC's Best Backpacking in New England (2nd edition), and the GMC's Long Trail Guide.

Here is a list of the fantastic backpacking opportunities in Vermont. If you know of any other backpacking sites in Vermont, please email me @ gparsons66@hotmail.com.





MOUNTAIN / DESTINATION AREA / REGION SCENIC / VIEW RATING # OF NIGHTS LODGING TYPE CROWD LEVEL NOTES & DESCRIPTION (is there a fee charged?) MORE INFO
Bromley Mountain / Bromley Shelter Manchester 7 / 10 1 shelter low to moderate features a relatively new and beautiful shelter (one of the best on the Long Trail) and splendid views from fire tower on top of Bromley Mountain; an excellent first family-friendly backpacking trip n/a
Burnt Rock Mountain / Cowles Cove Shelter Burlington / Waterbury unknown 1 shelter low to moderate this Long Trail shelter is located about 1.5 miles south of the wonderful ledges of Burnt Rock Mountain; access to the shelter can be done via Hedgehog Brook Trail (trailhead on Big Basin Road in North Fayston) or by taking the Beane Trail > Long Trail (trailhead on Carse Road in Hanksville) n/a
Camel's Hump / Bamforth Ridge Shelter Burlington / Waterbury 10 / 10 1 shelter high to very high many would argue that Camel's Hump is the finest big peak in Vermont; there are several approach trails (the finest route is probably the Forest City > Long Trail > Burrows Trail loop); views are incredible from Camel's Humps' bald and rocky summit; two nearby cabins/shelters along the Long Trail provide some basic backcountry lodging options; the wildest and least developed of Vermont's five 4000-footers; typically snow-and-ice-free from late May/early June through early October (like most 4000-footers in New England) ($ fee is charged) n/a
Camel's Hump / Hump Brook  Burlington / Waterbury 9 / 10 1 tent sites high to very high many would argue that Camel's Hump is the finest big peak in Vermont; there are several approach trails; the finest route is probably the Forest City > Long Trail > Burrows Trail loop; views are incredible from its bald and rocky summit; two nearby cabins/shelters along the Long Trail provide some basic backcountry lodging options; the wildest and least developed of Vermont's five 4000-footers; typically snow-and-ice-free from late May/early June through early October (like most 4000-footers) more info
Camel's Hump / Montclair Glen Shelter Burlington / Waterbury 10 / 10 1 shelter high to very high many would argue that Camel's Hump is the finest big peak in Vermont; there are several approach trails; the finest route is probably the Forest City > Long Trail > Burrows Trail loop; views are incredible from its bald and rocky summit; two nearby cabins/shelters along the Long Trail provide some basic backcountry lodging options; the wildest and least developed of Vermont's five 4000-footers; typically snow-and-ice-free from late May/early June through early October (like most 4000-footers) more info
Glastenbury Mountain / Goddard Shelter Bennington 8 / 10 1 shelter moderate this 20-mile loop travels into one of the most remote areas of Vermont; wild & open views from the fire tower atop Glastenbury Mountain and also some other lookouts en route; one of the finest hiking loops in Vermont; trailhead is located on VT 9; take Long Trail north to Glastenbury Mountain and the Goddard Shelter and return via West Ridge Trail and then a road walk on Hollo Road and VT 9 east;  more info
Griffith Lake / Baker Peak / Big Branch Wilderness Area  / Peru Peak Shelter Manchester 8 / 10 1 shelter, tent sites moderate to high this 15.6 mile lollipop-style loop starts and ends on Danby-Langrove Road (US Forest Service Road 10); open views from Baker Peak; this trip combines the Old Job Trail with the Long Trail; additional tent sites available at nearby Giffith Lake (fee charged); if you want to camp at Peru Peak Shelter or Griffith Lake but want a shorter hike, you can hike in from the Lake Trail (trailhead on South End Road off US-7) ($ fee is charged) n/a
Jay Peak / Jay Camp Shelter Jay unknown 1 cabin low to moderate this Long Trail shelter is only a short distance from VT 242, but it can be used a basecamp for hiking Jay Peak (which has a rocky, open summit); Jay Peak is only 1.7 miles from VT 242, so this is one of the easiest backpacking trips in Vermont; if you want a longer backpacking trip that includes Jay Peak, you can do a 9.3 mile traverse from VT 242 to VT 105 and stay at either the Shooting Star, Laura Woodward or Jay Camp shelters n/a
Killington Peak / Cooper Lodge Rutland / Killington 8 / 10 1 shelter moderate to high the highest shelter/lodge on the Long Trail; the lodge is only 0.2 mile below the summit of Killington Peak; there are about a half-dozen ways to reach the shelter and summit, but the easiest is via the Bucklin Trail from Wheelerville Road at 'Brewers Cortners' (although there are some steep sections on this route); be aware that Cooper Lodge is a rock-based shelter and some hikers have said that 'it's really not that nice of a place to stay'; open views from the summit of Killington Peak (Vermont's 2nd tallest mountain) n/a
Little Rock Pond / Lula Tye Shelter / Little Rock Pond Shelter Rutland / Manchester 8 / 10 1 shelter low to moderate stay in one of two shelters within a short distance of Little Rock Pond; access to the pond and shelters is possible via several routes, including the Long Trail from Forest Service Road 10 and the Homer Stone Brook Trail from a trailhead in South Wallingford; don't miss the side-trip to views on Green Mountain n/a
Long Trail - full traverse Various 10 / 10 25-30 cabin, shelters, tent sites moderate to extremely high a full hike of the Long Trail involves a 270-ish mile trip from the border of Massachusetts (near Williamstown) to the border of Canada (near North Troy, Vermont); this trip, which typically takes 25-30 days, is extremely rugged and many sections are quite remote; one of the finest month-long backpacking trips in the United States; a total of approximately 65-70 shelters (a mix of lean-tos, cabins and other wooden structures) are available for use by hikers, and most are FREE; nearly the entire trail can be day-hiked, but spending a month on this trail can be an ethereal experience; the first half of the trail is shared with the Appalachian Trail, so the shelters can seem crowded in July & August; the long-trail is the oldest long-distance hiking route in the US n/a
Long Trail - traverse #1 (Pine Cobble Road in Williamstown, MA to VT 9) Bennington / Southwestern Vermont 8 / 10 1-2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 17-miles from the Pine Cobble Trail trailhead in Williamstown MA to trailhead on VT 9 east of Bennington; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route n/a
Long Trail - traverse #2 (VT 9 to Kelley Stand Road) Bennington / Manchester / Southwestern Vermont 9 / 10 2-3 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 23-miles from VT 9 east of Bennington to Kelley Stand Road; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route; includes the awesome & remote summit of Glastenbury Mountain n/a
Long Trail - traverse #3 (Kelley Stand Road to VT 11/30 east of Manchester) Manchester / Southwestern Vermont 9 / 10 1-2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 17.5-miles from Kelley Stand Road to VT 11/30 east of Manchester; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route (a fee is currently charged at Stratton Pond Shelter); includes scenic Stratton Pond and good views from Spruce Peak ($ fee is charged) n/a
Long Trail - traverse #4 (VT 11/30 east of Manchester to US Forest Service Road #10 east of Danby) Manchester / Southwestern Vermont 8 / 10 1-2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 17.3-miles from VT 11/30 east of Manchester to US Forest Service Road #10 east of Danby; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route (a fee is currently charged at Peru Peak Shelter); includes fire tower views of Bromley Mountain and great views from Baker Peak ($ fee is charged) n/a
Long Trail - traverse #5 (US Forest Service Road #10 east of Danby to VT 103 east of Clarendon) Rutland / Central Vermont 8 / 10 1 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 14.8-miles from US Forest Service Road #10 east of Danby to VT 103 east of Clarendon; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route (a fee is currently charged at Little Rock Pond Shelter and Lula Tye Shelter); great reviews from several short spur trails en route (including Green Mountain and White Rocks) ($ fee is charged) n/a
Long Trail - traverse #6 (VT 103 east of Clarendon to US-4 west of Killington) Rutland / Killington / Central Vermont 9 / 10 1-2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 17.4 miles from VT 103 east of Clarendon to US-4 west of Killington; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route; fantastic views from Killington Peak n/a
Long Trail - traverse #7 (US-4 west of Killington to VT 73 at 'Brandon Gap') Killington / Central Vermont 7 / 10 2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 20.0 miles from US-4 west of Killington to VT 73 at 'Brandon Gap'; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route n/a
Long Trail - traverse #8
(VT 73 'Brandon Gap' to Lincoln Gap Road)
Central Vermont 7 / 10 3-4 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 27.2 miles from VT 73 in 'Brandon Gap' to Lincoln Gap Road; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route n/a
Long Trail - traverse #9
(Lincoln Gap Road to VT 17 at 'Appalachian Gap')
Central Vermont 9 / 10 1 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 11.6 miles from Lincoln Gap Road to VT 17 at 'Appalachian Gap'; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route (a fee is currently charged at Battell Shelter) ($ fee is charged) n/a
Long Trail - traverse #10
(VT 17 at 'Appalachian Gap' to Duxbury Road)
Waterbury / Central Vermont 10 / 10 2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 18.8 miles from VT 17 at 'Appalachian Gap' to Duxbury Road; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route (a fee is currently charged at Montclair Glen); this section of the trail passes over the summit of Camel's Hump, which is perhaps the finest mountain in Vermont; of all the sections of the Long Trail, this is likely to be my favorite ($ fee is charged) n/a
Long Trail - traverse #11
(Duxbury Road to VT 108 'Smugglers Notch')
Waterbury / Stowe 10 / 10 3-4 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 26.1 miles from Duxbury Road to VT 108 in Smugglers Notch (you can skip 3.2 miles of this distance by avoiding the road walk on Duxbury Road); overnight lodging available at several shelters en route (a fee is currently charged at Butler Lodge and Taft Lodge); this section of the trail passes over the summit of Mount Mansfield, which is the high point of Vermont and offers a significant amount of travel in the 'alpine zone' ($ fee is charged) n/a
Long Trail - traverse #12
(VT 108 at 'Smugglers Notch' to VT 15)
Stowe / Johnson 8 / 10 1-2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 15.0 miles from VT 108 in Smugglers Notch to VT 15 west of Johnson; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route (a fee is currently charged at Sterling Pond Shelter) ($ fee is charged) n/a
Long Trail - traverse #13
(VT 15 to VT 118)
Johnson / Northern Vermont 8 / 10 2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 21.1 miles from VT 15 west of Johnson to VT 118 east of Belvidere Corners; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route n/a
Long Trail - traverse #14
(VT 118 to VT 242)
Jay / Northern Vermont 8 / 10 1-2 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 16.8 miles from VT 118 east of Belvidere Corners to VT 242 southwest of Jay; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route n/a
Long Trail - traverse #15
(VT 242 to end of the Long Trail at Journey's End Road)
Jay / Northern Vermont 9 / 10 1 shelters moderate to high this section of the Long Trail is for 13.2 miles from VT 242 southwest of Jay to the end of the trail on Journey's End Road; overnight lodging available at several shelters en route n/a
Mt. Abraham / Battell Shelter Warren / Lincoln / Lincoln Gap 8 / 10 1 shelter moderate to high this trip visits Mt. Abraham, which is one of five of Vermont's '4000-footers'; 360-degree views from the summit; an unmarked but short spur trail north of the summit visits a plane crash site (parts of the plane are still there - do not touch or move them!); the Battell Shelter is about 1.0 mile south of the summit; access to the shelter is possible by hiking the Long Trail north from 'Lincoln Gap' or you can hike east along the Battell Trail from US Forest Service Road 350; additional views can be obtained by hiking 0.8 miles north along the Long Trail to Lincoln Peak; Mt. Ellen (another 4000-footer) is also nearby and can be added to this trip fairly easily ($ fee is charged) n/a
Mt. Ellen / Glen Ellen Lodge Warren 6 / 10  1 shelter moderate to high this trip visits Mt. Ellen, which is one of five of Vermont's '4000-footers'; the Glen Ellen Lodge is about 1.8 miles north of the summit; access to the shelter is possible by either hiking the Long Trail south from 'Appalachian Gap' on VT 17 or by hiking east along the Jerusalem Trail from Dwire Road in Jerusalem; the actual summit does not have views, but there are views from the top of the ski lift of Sugarloaf Resort just to the north of the summit n/a
Mt. Grant / Breadloaf Mountain / Cooley Glen Shelter / Emily Proctor Shelter Warren 7 / 10 shelters moderate to high there are two shelters to chose from on this loop; trailhead is located on US Forest Service Road 201, which is off US Forest Service Road 52 (the 'Natural Turnpike'); for this trip, take the Cooley Glen Trail to the Long Trail and then return via the Emily Proctor Trail; don't miss the moderate spur trails to the summit of Mt. Grant and Bread Loaf Mountain (good views on both) more info
Mt. Mansfield / Butler Lodge Stowe 10 / 10 1-2 cabin very high to extremely high Butler Lodge is located on the southern slopes of Mt. Mansfield; from the shelter, there is a vast network of trails that can bring you to the top of Mt. Mansfield (which is called 'The Chin'); Mt. Mansfield is Vermont's tallest mountain and has a strong alpine character to it, although there is an auto-road that brings tourists within 1.3 miles (and 600 vertical feet) of the summit and a gondola that brings people ever closer than that; Butler Lodge is on a short spur trail off the Long Trail; views from the ridgeline of Mt. Mansfield and from the summit are some of the finest in Vermont ($ fee is charged) more info
Mt. Mansfield / Taft Lodge Stowe 10 / 10 1-2 cabin extremely high Taft Lodge is the closest lodge to the open summit of Mt. Mansfield (which is called 'The Chin'); Mt. Mansfield is Vermont's tallest mountain and has a strong alpine character to it, although there is an auto-road that brings tourists within 1.3 miles (and 600 vertical feet) of the summit and a gondola that brings people ever closer than that; Taft Lodge is located on the Long Trail and is extremely popular; views from the ridgeline of Mt. Mansfield and from the summit are some of the finest in Vermont ($ fee is charged) more info
Mt. Mansfield Loop Stowe 10 / 10 1-2 shelters, tent sites extremely high a fantastic loop hike of Mt. Mansfield can be done by starting at several of the mountains western trailheads, including those at the end of Stevensville Road or Mountain Road; overnight accommodations available at Taylor Lodge, Butler Lodge, Taft Lodge and there are also tent sites at Twin Brook; Mt. Mansfield is Vermont's tallest mountain and has a strong alpine character to it, although there is an auto-road that brings tourists within 1.3 miles (and 600 vertical feet) of the summit and a gondola that brings people ever closer than that; views from the ridgeline of Mt. Mansfield and from the summit are some of the finest in Vermont ($ fee is charged) more info
Pico Peak / Pico Camp / Churchill Scott Shelter Rutland / Killington 6 / 10 1 shelter, cabin moderate to high good views from the ski slopes and summit of Pico Mountain; can be done as loop by combining the Sherbune Pass Trail with the Long Trail (a 1.0 mile road-walk is required, unless you are willing to do an additional mini-loop to the north of US-4 in order to return back to your original trailhead); two shelters are available along this route n/a
Skylight Pond / Skyline Lodge Warren 7 / 10 1 cabin low to moderate this pond and lodge can be accessed via the Skylight Pond Trail from US Forest Service Road 59, by hiking north along the Long Trail from VT 125 or by hiking south from the Emily Proctor Trail to the Long Trail; several views possible a short distance south along the Long Trail (although the spur trails can be tough to spot); if you have two cars or are willing to mountain bike or walk between trailheads, you can create a loop or traverse out of this hike (consult a map to see your options) n/a
Bourn Pond / Lye Brook Wilderness Manchester 7 / 10 1 tent sites low to moderate there are two tent sites located near the shores of Bourn Pond (on several maps they are referred to as 'North Bourn Pond' and 'South Bourn Pond'); there are a half-dozen routes into the pond that can be taken, so you'll absolutely want to study a map of the area to choose your routes in and out (if you have two cars, you can do a highly rewarding traverse; if you don't, there are still several loop options available to you, especially if you don't mind a little road walking); side-trips to Stratton Pond are encouraged n/a
Spruce Peak / Spruce Peak Shelter Manchester unknown 1 shelter low to moderate this short backpacking trip rewards you with great views from Spruce Peak; access to the shelter and peak is easiest by hiking the Long Trail south from VT 11/30, but you can also hike in from Old Rootville Road (and pass by Prospect Rock on the way in); if you have two cars available, you can turn this into a nice traverse between the two trailheads n/a
Sterling Pond / Sterling Pond Shelter Stowe 7 / 10 1 shelter, tent sites low to moderate enjoy this family-friendly 4.4 mile round-trip hike on the Sterling Pond Trail to peaceful Sterling Pond; trailhead is within the Smuggler's Notch passage on VT 108 (northeast of downtown Stowe); if you want a longer hike to the pond and shelter, you can reach them from the Long Trail instead of the Sterling Pond Trail ($ fee is charged) n/a
Stratton Mountain / Stratton Pond / Lye Brook Wilderness / Stratton Pond Shelter Southwestern Vermont 9 / 10 1 shelter, tent sites extremely high this 12.9 mile loop visits the fire tower atop Stratton Mountain and also scenic Stratton Pond, where you will find a shelter and some tent sites available for use; a 0.9 mile road walk is involved between two trailheads on Kelley Stand Road; if you have two cars available, you can backpack a traverse instead, finishing at one of several other available trailheads in this area (such as the Lye Brook Trail trailhead); there are a lot of great trails (and shelters & tent sites) in the network of trails around this area, so consult a map carefully when planning your trip; this area is one of the finest backpacking destinations in all of Vermont ($ fee is charged) n/a
Swansong Shelter Rutland / Killington unknown 1 shelter low to moderate a "secret" shelter available to overnight hikers that is on private land; this shelter is supposedly not shown on any trail map (or any map for that matter); exactly location is unknown to me….or am I electing not to disclose it on the internet??? ;) n/a
Taylor Lodge Stowe 8 / 10 1 shelter moderate to high this shelter on the Long Trail is located several miles south of Mt. Mansfield; easiest access is via the Lake Mansfield Trail from Nebraska Valley Road, although there are several longer access routes available if you want a longer backpacking trip; day trips to summit of Mt. Mansfield are tough but possible from here (however, there are two shelters that are located much closer to the summit if your goal is to stay overnight that serves well as a base-camp for climbing the mountain) n/a
White Rocks / Greenwall Shelter Rutland 7 / 10 1 shelter low to moderate this short out-and-back backpacking trip visits the fine views from White Rocks Cliffs; trailhead located on VT 140; if you have two vehicles, you can hike this as a traverse by linking the Long Trail with the Homer Stone Brook Trail (and visit Little Rock Pond along the way) n/a

Camel's Hump
Camel's Hump

Montclair Glen Lodge on Camel's Hump
Montclair Glen Lodge on Camel's Hump

Mount Mansfield
Mount Mansfield

TIPS FOR BACKPACKING IN VERMONT



1. Don't forget your camera, and remember to label the pictures after you are done with each hike (you'll want to capture these moments).
2. Use Trailsnh.com, Newenglandtrailconditions.com, Vftt.org or other internet sites to obtain the latest in trail conditions (especially in winter, when conditions can be highly variable).
3. Buy the a guidebooks and actually read each relevant chapter before you take a backpacking trip.
4. Bring friends with you on your backpacking adventures (so long as you sincerely believe they will be capable of hiking these mountains and will actually enjoy the terrain and trails that you are selecting for them).
5. Invest in high-quality hiking shoes or boots.
6. Save your knees so that you can still hike when you are in your 70's (use trekking poles!).
7. Always leave a note or tell someone which mountain and trails you will be hiking (too many people get lost and/or injured in these mountains).
8. Don't leave anything valuable in your car (too many break-ins have been occurring, unfortunately).
9. Learn the value of hitch-hiking, using a car-spot, and/or mountain biking between trailheads (a traverse is always more interesting than an out-and-back hike!).
10. Most people avoid backpacking in Vermont from November through May (the conditions are usually not favorable).
11. Start your hikes early (i.e. before 6:30-7:00am) to beat most of the crowds and have a better shot of grabbing a space within a shelter or at an established tent site.
12. Study hiking maps and be creative in the routes you take (you don't always have to take the easiest or most-straightforward trails).
13. Mid-week September hiking is amazing. Hike at least once during this time-frame (call out sick from work if you have to).
14. Carry the appropriate food based on the season you are hiking in (some foods will melt in summer, and some foods become rock-solid in winter).
15. Attack some burgers and beers after at least some of the hikes (or all of them). You've earned it.
16. Get that $20 REI membership to save 8-10% on all full-price REI purchases for the rest of your life (you have no idea how much time you'll probably spend at their stores and on rei.com). Also, strongly consider getting the REI credit card (you can earn hundreds of dollars in dividends each year if you use this credit card as your primary card for your non-REI purchases!).
17. Do the great mountains on the bluebird days, and the less interesting mountains on the overcast or lousy-weather days.
18. Don't miss backpacking in Vermont during peak fall foliage.
19. Enjoy that Gatorade (or some other drink that has electrolytes).
20. Ibuprofen can be extremely helpful in controlling pain and/or reducing swelling.
21. Be safe out there - these mountains can be nasty (even deadly) in adverse weather conditions. Snow and ice can also be very problematic.
22. If you are short on hiking friends, consider joining a Meetup hiking group (there are several groups and they always have good hikes planned).
23. Spend time perusing at least a few gear stores that focus on hiking & backpacking equipment.
24. Take a wilderness first aid course.
25. Try to read the weather frequently while hiking, and react quickly to changes in clouds.
26. Don't be afraid to turn back if your energy levels are low or the weather is deteriorating (most hikers will be turned back at some point).
27. Catch a sunset or sunrise from a mountain top (bring at least one headlamp).
28. Always treat water before drinking it (use iodine, boil, or use a filter)
29. Try to limit your first backpacking trip to no more than 6-8 miles a day (some will want to do even less miles than this)
30. Don't forget to have fun!

BACKPACKING IN THE OTHER NEW ENGLAND STATES



Newenglandwaterfalls.com has also created backpacking guides to some of the other New England states. Those pages can be found here:

BACKPACKING CHECKLIST



Here is a quick packing list for your next backpacking trip. You probably won't want or need to bring all these items, but I have listed them here anyway for your consideration.
  • FOOD & WATER
    • Food and snacks
    • Water
    • Electrolytes drink (i.e. Gatorade, Powerade, etc.)
    • Coffee
  • BACKPACKING GEAR
    • Hiking shoes or hiking boots
    • Backpack
    • Backpack cover or bag liner
    • Tent, tarp-tent, bivy, or hammock
    • Sleeping bag or quilt
    • Sleeping pad
    • Headlamp and batteries
    • Guidebook or route description
    • Permits (if applicable)
    • Trail Map
    • Water bottles and/or water bladder/hydration reservoir
    • Water filter
    • Trash bag
    • Stuff sack
    • Pillow
    • Trekking poles
    • Sunglasses / contacts
    • Camp shoes, down booties, sandals or crocs
    • Gaiters
    • Tent footprint, tarp or ground cloth
    • Fishing gear
    • Sanitation shovel
    • Camp chair
  • CLOTHING
    • Shirts-quick drying
    • Socks
    • Hiking pants, hiking shorts or kilts
    • Waterproof jacket
    • Camp clothing
    • Underwear-quick drying
    • Waterproof hiking pants
    • Fleece jacket, softshell jacket and/or down jacket
    • Bandana and/or face towel
    • Towel
    • Hat
    • Winter hat
    • Winter gloves or mittens
    • Winter facemask or balaclava
  • COOKING & EATING
    • Stove and fuel
    • Cooking utensils
    • Cooking pot and/or cooking bowl
    • Bowls and/or plates
    • Cups
  • COMFORT & TIOLETRIES
    • Tiolet paper
    • Hand sanitizer
    • Baby wipes
    • Toothbrush/toothpaste
    • Earplugs
    • Bug spray
    • Bug net
    • Deodorant
    • Sun-screen lotion
    • Lip balm
    • Aloe Vera
    • Bio-degradeable soap
  • SAFETY & SECURITY
    • Matches or lighter
    • Safety whistle
    • Medical kit
    • Knife, Razor-blade or multi-tool
    • Identification
    • Money/Cash
    • Compass
    • Duct tape or superglue
    • Rope or nylon cord
    • First-aid Handbook
    • GPS
    • Altimeter
    • Signaling mirror
    • Phone
    • Bear bag or canister
    • Watch
    • Personal location beacon ('PLB')
    • Foot traction
    • Ice axe
    • Bear spray
  • FUN STUFF
    • Camera
    • Alcohol/booze
    • Plastic wine glasses
    • Tripod or mini-tripod
    • Playing cards
    • Book/magazine/e-reader
    • Pet supplies
    • Pencil/pen/paper
    • Mini-speakers
    • Miniature lantern
    • Binoculars / monoculars
Click here for a more comprehensive backpacking checklist, including some recommended brands for gear.

GUIDEBOOKS TO GET YOU THERE



The following guidebooks are trusted resources to help on backpacking trips in Vermont. Click on any book to read reviews and/or purchase on Amazon.com. I personally own (and love) each of these guidebooks.









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